Development and testing of a novel neural restoration technology for people with spinal cord injury

Status: Current

Dates: 2019 - Start

Māori Relevant Content: No

Project Abstract

Grant Text: For thousands of years spinal cord injury (SCI) was thought to be irreversible. This view is now changing. Recent scientific evidence has shown that thought-controlled rehabilitation robots can restore some voluntary movement in SCI. Other studies have also shown that electrically stimulating spinal cord or muscles can help. But to maximize benefits, all these technologies must be controlled intelligently and adapt to the patient.

A Digital Twin is a computer representation of a person's bones, muscles, joints, and nervous system. To date, Digital Twin technology has been used to predict surgery outcomes and prevent sport injury. Now, Digital Twin technology could be used in real-time to virtually bypass the site of SCI, connecting again brain, spinal cord, and muscles.

We propose to develop and test the efficacy of BioSpine, a novel neural restoration technology co-designed by patients, clinicians, researchers, and engineers to restore movement in people with SCI.

Funded by the Motor Accident Insurance Commission (AUD$2,000,000)

Researchers - UC Staff

Researchers - Non-UC Staff

  • Rod Barrett: Principal Investigator; Griffith University
  • Leanne Bisset: Principal Investigator; Griffith University
  • Christopher Carty: Principal Investigator; Griffith University
  • Kelly Clanchy: Principal Investigator; Griffith University
  • Laura Diamond: Principal Investigator; Griffith University
  • Che Fornusek: Principal Investigator; The University of Sydney
  • Elizabeth Kendall: Principal Investigator; Griffith University
  • David LLoyd: Principal Investigator; Griffith University
  • Dinesh Palipana OAM: Principal Investigator; Griffith University
  • Claudio Pizzolato: Principal Investigator; Griffith University
  • Surendran Sabapathy: Principal Investigator; Griffith University
  • David Saxby: Principal Investigator; Griffith University
  • Yang Teng: Principal Investigator; Harvard University

Subject Area: Disciplines

Resources